Do you package produce in paper bags?

We have been doing lots of trials this year with plastic substitutes. 

 

Paper bags are not good at keeping vegetables fresh for a couple of reasons. Firstly they do not control humidity levels well so the shelf life of soft greens is reduced by 2-3 days. Secondly, they require manual filling, as opposed to the use of a flow wrap / vertical form filler which will wipe another 1-2 days. It’s for that reason it’s not such a simple change for us. 

 

 

At the moment, plastic is the most sustainable material to do that for many ingredients. We’re constantly researching and testing new packaging options that will help achieve our mission. We’re balancing long-term environmental impact with protecting and preserving your food.

 

As you may have spotted, we’ve finally cracked it with our new egg boxes! But that’s not all – discover our other recyclables below.

RECYCLE ME!

  • Boxes (including our new cool box), brown bags (with labels still attached) and recipe books
  • Tins like coconut milk, jackfruit and pulses
  • Pods for spices, peanut paste, nuts and dried fruit
  • Cardboard punnets used for tomatoes and mushrooms
  • rPET trays used for tofu, chicken, pork, turkey and salmon

Was this article helpful?

31 out of 32 found this helpful

Recycling and our environmental footprint

Do you package produce in paper bags?

We have been doing lots of trials this year with plastic substitutes. 

 

Paper bags are not good at keeping vegetables fresh for a couple of reasons. Firstly they do not control humidity levels well so the shelf life of soft greens is reduced by 2-3 days. Secondly, they require manual filling, as opposed to the use of a flow wrap / vertical form filler which will wipe another 1-2 days. It’s for that reason it’s not such a simple change for us. 

 

 

At the moment, plastic is the most sustainable material to do that for many ingredients. We’re constantly researching and testing new packaging options that will help achieve our mission. We’re balancing long-term environmental impact with protecting and preserving your food.

 

As you may have spotted, we’ve finally cracked it with our new egg boxes! But that’s not all – discover our other recyclables below.

RECYCLE ME!

  • Boxes (including our new cool box), brown bags (with labels still attached) and recipe books
  • Tins like coconut milk, jackfruit and pulses
  • Pods for spices, peanut paste, nuts and dried fruit
  • Cardboard punnets used for tomatoes and mushrooms
  • rPET trays used for tofu, chicken, pork, turkey and salmon

Was this article helpful?

31 out of 32 found this helpful

Do you package produce in paper bags?

We have been doing lots of trials this year with plastic substitutes. 

 

Paper bags are not good at keeping vegetables fresh for a couple of reasons. Firstly they do not control humidity levels well so the shelf life of soft greens is reduced by 2-3 days. Secondly, they require manual filling, as opposed to the use of a flow wrap / vertical form filler which will wipe another 1-2 days. It’s for that reason it’s not such a simple change for us. 

 

 

At the moment, plastic is the most sustainable material to do that for many ingredients. We’re constantly researching and testing new packaging options that will help achieve our mission. We’re balancing long-term environmental impact with protecting and preserving your food.

 

As you may have spotted, we’ve finally cracked it with our new egg boxes! But that’s not all – discover our other recyclables below.

RECYCLE ME!

  • Boxes (including our new cool box), brown bags (with labels still attached) and recipe books
  • Tins like coconut milk, jackfruit and pulses
  • Pods for spices, peanut paste, nuts and dried fruit
  • Cardboard punnets used for tomatoes and mushrooms
  • rPET trays used for tofu, chicken, pork, turkey and salmon

Was this article helpful?

31 out of 32 found this helpful